Thomas Carr

Thomas Carr is an archaeologist and photographer living in Denver, Colorado. He received his BA in 1992 from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and his MA in 1996 from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

He works with digital and film cameras and makes traditional silver-emulsion darkroom prints and archival inkjet prints. His work has been shown in numerous juried, group, and solo exhibitions over the last 40 years, including solo exhibitions at the Denver Public Library, Center of Southwest Studies, University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, and Dairy Arts Center.

In characterizing his work, he states “as a young photographer in the 1980s, I found myself drawn towards making images of places with subtle indications of a past human presence. Having been trained in photography, I endeavor to document the essence of these places in visual terms. This subtle sense of presence is what I seek in my photography.”

Visit: ThomasCarrPhotography.com

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Jim Montague
We live in a world that values speed and technology. Yet, as a photographer and artist, I crave a slower pace with a focus on nature and storytelling with my work. I’m drawn to everyday life and objects – whether it’s my own shell collection or finding out what others treasure in their lives. I see a special beauty and value in these objects of our past and the craftsmanship of those who still work with their hands. After a career in public relations, I’m searching for an emotional connection in my photography. While so many photographers have moved on to digital cameras, I’ve stayed with film and the darkroom. There’s something special about the film process that slows you down not only when shooting but also in the darkroom. Using a Hasselblad medium format camera, each of my silver gelatin photographs are hand-printed using archival darkroom techniques.
We live in a world that values speed and technology. Yet, as a photographer and artist, I crave a slower pace with a focus on nature and storytelling with my work. I’m drawn to everyday life and objects – whether it’s my own shell collection or finding out what others treasure in their lives. I see a special beauty and value in these objects of our past and the craftsmanship of those who still work with their hands. After a career in public relations, I’m searching for an emotional connection in my photography. While so many photographers have moved on to digital cameras, I’ve stayed with film and the darkroom. There’s something special about the film process that slows you down not only when shooting but also in the darkroom. Using a Hasselblad medium format camera, each of my silver gelatin photographs are hand-printed using archival darkroom techniques.
We live in a world that values speed and technology. Yet, as a photographer and artist, I crave a slower pace with a focus on nature and storytelling with my work. I’m drawn to everyday life and objects – whether it’s my own shell collection or finding out what others treasure in their lives. I see a special beauty and value in these objects of our past and the craftsmanship of those who still work with their hands. After a career in public relations, I’m searching for an emotional connection in my photography. While so many photographers have moved on to digital cameras, I’ve stayed with film and the darkroom. There’s something special about the film process that slows you down not only when shooting but also in the darkroom. Using a Hasselblad medium format camera, each of my silver gelatin photographs are hand-printed using archival darkroom techniques.
We live in a world that values speed and technology. Yet, as a photographer and artist, I crave a slower pace with a focus on nature and storytelling with my work. I’m drawn to everyday life and objects – whether it’s my own shell collection or finding out what others treasure in their lives. I see a special beauty and value in these objects of our past and the craftsmanship of those who still work with their hands. After a career in public relations, I’m searching for an emotional connection in my photography. While so many photographers have moved on to digital cameras, I’ve stayed with film and the darkroom. There’s something special about the film process that slows you down not only when shooting but also in the darkroom. Using a Hasselblad medium format camera, each of my silver gelatin photographs are hand-printed using archival darkroom techniques.

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