Michael Trupiano

As his art evolved from purely representational to more thematic work he began exploring in-camera movements, multiple and long exposures, pin-hole, zone-plate, and photo-montage; basically any tool available to realize his vision.  Michael is interested in how light, both manmade, sunlight, and moonlight — individually or in combination — change the nature of the object being photographed.  He is also interested in how our memory of a place effects our feelings about his images.  As a result his images evoke a feeling of both something known and something unfamiliar.  More and more the objects are reduced to not what they are but how they affect the light around them.  And as a result how we perceive the world around us.

The work is not complete until a master print is created.  While viewing images on line represent that overwhelming majority of how images are consumed today Michael feels strongly in the physical print either through a book, a portfolio, or framed on a wall.  In order to complete the work started in camera through post-production Michael now works in platinum / palladium, gum over platinum / palladium, carbon transfer, polymer gravure, and pigment ink printing. 

Visit: MichaelTrupiano.com

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Jim Montague
We live in a world that values speed and technology. Yet, as a photographer and artist, I crave a slower pace with a focus on nature and storytelling with my work. I’m drawn to everyday life and objects – whether it’s my own shell collection or finding out what others treasure in their lives. I see a special beauty and value in these objects of our past and the craftsmanship of those who still work with their hands. After a career in public relations, I’m searching for an emotional connection in my photography. While so many photographers have moved on to digital cameras, I’ve stayed with film and the darkroom. There’s something special about the film process that slows you down not only when shooting but also in the darkroom. Using a Hasselblad medium format camera, each of my silver gelatin photographs are hand-printed using archival darkroom techniques.
We live in a world that values speed and technology. Yet, as a photographer and artist, I crave a slower pace with a focus on nature and storytelling with my work. I’m drawn to everyday life and objects – whether it’s my own shell collection or finding out what others treasure in their lives. I see a special beauty and value in these objects of our past and the craftsmanship of those who still work with their hands. After a career in public relations, I’m searching for an emotional connection in my photography. While so many photographers have moved on to digital cameras, I’ve stayed with film and the darkroom. There’s something special about the film process that slows you down not only when shooting but also in the darkroom. Using a Hasselblad medium format camera, each of my silver gelatin photographs are hand-printed using archival darkroom techniques.
We live in a world that values speed and technology. Yet, as a photographer and artist, I crave a slower pace with a focus on nature and storytelling with my work. I’m drawn to everyday life and objects – whether it’s my own shell collection or finding out what others treasure in their lives. I see a special beauty and value in these objects of our past and the craftsmanship of those who still work with their hands. After a career in public relations, I’m searching for an emotional connection in my photography. While so many photographers have moved on to digital cameras, I’ve stayed with film and the darkroom. There’s something special about the film process that slows you down not only when shooting but also in the darkroom. Using a Hasselblad medium format camera, each of my silver gelatin photographs are hand-printed using archival darkroom techniques.
We live in a world that values speed and technology. Yet, as a photographer and artist, I crave a slower pace with a focus on nature and storytelling with my work. I’m drawn to everyday life and objects – whether it’s my own shell collection or finding out what others treasure in their lives. I see a special beauty and value in these objects of our past and the craftsmanship of those who still work with their hands. After a career in public relations, I’m searching for an emotional connection in my photography. While so many photographers have moved on to digital cameras, I’ve stayed with film and the darkroom. There’s something special about the film process that slows you down not only when shooting but also in the darkroom. Using a Hasselblad medium format camera, each of my silver gelatin photographs are hand-printed using archival darkroom techniques.

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